C1: “heartbreak” versus “heartache”.

Here is the song I told you about today, “Boulder to Birmingham”, by flabbergasting Emmylou Harris. However, I made a mistake. I brought the song up in class because I thought it contained the word “heartache”, but it doesn’t. It contains the word “heartbreak” though, which means pretty much the same. Well, I guess you can enjoy the music all the same:

The lyrics:

I don’t want to hear a love song
I got on this airplane just to fly
And I know there’s life below
But all that it can show me
Is the prairie and the sky

And I don’t want to hear a sad story
Full of heartbreak and desire
The last time I felt like this
It was in the wilderness and the canyon was on fire
And I stood on the mountain in the night and I watched it burn
I watched it burn, I watched it burn.

I would rock my soul in the bosom of Abraham
I would hold my life in his saving grace.
I would walk all the way from Boulder to Birmingham
If I thought I could see, I could see your face.

Well you really got me this time
And the hardest part is knowing I’ll survive.
I have come to listen for the sound
Of the trucks as they move down
Out on ninety five
And pretend that it’s the ocean
coming down to wash me clean, to wash me clean
Baby do you know what I mean

I would rock my soul in the bosom of Abraham
I would hold my life in his saving grace.
I would walk all the way from Boulder to Birmingham
If I thought I could see, I could see your face.

There is a very well-known song which does contain the word “heartache” though – “It’s a Heartache”, by mesmerizing Bonnie Tyler:

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2 Responses to C1: “heartbreak” versus “heartache”.

  1. Juan Pablo says:

    I had my mind in this song when I came up with this term. But I also thought on another marvellous song by this same singer: Total eclipse of the heart https://youtu.be/lcOxhH8N3Bo

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